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Welcome to Children's Voice: CASA, Inc.

Children's Voice: CASA, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, located in Douglas County, Georgia, committed to recruit, train and support citizen-volunteers to advocate for the best interests of children, who have been abused and neglected, in courtrooms and our community. We are empowered directly by the courts and provide judges the critical information they need to ensure that each child’s rights and needs are being attended to while in foster care. Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteers stay with children until they are placed in loving permanent homes. For many children, a CASA volunteer is the only constant adult presence in their lives.

We exist to raise awareness of children in foster care and bring positive, permanent change to their lives. With your help we can make a difference. Our website furthers our mission by providing ways for you to learn more and get involved.

Thanks for visiting. We are looking forward to hearing from you. 

CASA Tweets

  • Programs in 49 States

    950

  • dedicated volunteers

    93,300

  • Children Served Annually

    271,800

3 Facts for Autism Awareness

Shine a light on autism for Autism Awareness Day on April 2. Autism Spectrum Disorder is a serious developmental disorder that impairs the ability to communicate and interact. Autism has increased in diagnosis in the United States recently, and yet is widely unrecognized. In fact, autism is the fastest-growing developmental disorder in the U.S. and costs a family $60,000 a year on average. Even with those costs, there is still no cure for autism.

If you’re interested in learning more about autism from a personal perspective, read “The Reason I Jump” by Naoki Higashida. Naoki is severely autistic and is unable to communicate without a keyboard. Take a moment to learn more about autism and teach others, too. Here are three facts for autism awareness:

The signs—Be aware of the signs of autism, because they may not be so apparent. Here are just a few: no big smiles or warm expressions by six months, no babbling by 12 months, no words by 16 months, any loss of speech or social skills at any age.

The treatment—Every child is unique, and since autism has a variety of severities, each treatment should be tailored to each child and each diagnosis. Although, it is strongly recommended that if autism is suspected in an infant or toddler, an early intervention therapy is started. There are many specialized autism therapists to help families.

Prevalence—In March 2014, the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found in a new study that 1 in 68 children (1 in 42 boys and 1 in 189 girls) is identified as having an autism disorder.